KIPP Opens New Charter High School In North Forest

KIPP Founder Michael Feinberg tells students that they have a responsibility to set the culture for the new KIPP high school for years to come.
As the new school year starts, we’ve been taking a look at different issues in education. One issue is charter schools. While they have their critics, their numbers continue to grow in Houston.

This is a ribbon cutting for a brand new high school in North Forest.

It’s the fourth high school in Houston for the KIPP charter school network.

“On three everyone, one, two, three!

Every member of the freshman class helps cut the bright blue ribbon.

KIPP founder Michael Feinberg tells the students they each have a special role.

“You have that extra responsibility to set the tone for what goes on in this high school and what goes on in this campus for decades to come.”

KIPP students
About 120 freshmen join the ribbon-cutting for the new KIPP high school in the North Forest community. Each one cut part of the blue ribbon and saved a piece as a memento.

KIPP started its Northeast campus here in this shopping center seven years ago.

“We’ve taken over the entire shopping center so now it’s a bastion of education, teaching and learning where ultimately there’s going to be over 2,000 KIPPsters preK through 12th grade climbing the mountain to and through college on an annual basis.”

Feinberg says overall KIPP has nearly 11,000 students in Houston.

He started the network 19 years ago, and he sees more room to grow.

“We’re not yet at a point where we can stop growth. And that’s because last year we had nearly 10,000 kids and parents sign up to come to KIPP. Even with a lot of our growth we’ve only had room for 2,000 of those kids of those kids and parents. So we said, ‘Sorry no room,’ to 8,000 kids and parents who want to come.

Feinberg sees at least another decade of growth for KIPP in Houston.

Bio photo of Laura Isensee

Laura Isensee

Education Reporter

Laura Isensee covers education for KUHF, including K-12 and higher education.

Previously, she was a staff reporter at The Miami Herald and regularly contributed to WLRN, the local NPR affiliate and Miami Herald news partner...