What The Failed $500 Million Bond Proposal Means For Lone Star College

Over the weekend, voters rejected a bond package worth almost $500 million for the Lone Star College System. It would have paid for more classrooms and technology upgrades, among other things. Why did the bond fail and what it means for the college?

If it were up to voters in Harris County, the bond package for Lone Star College would have passed — albeit by a small margin.

But voters in Montgomery County strongly rejected the measure.

Kyle Scott is a newly elected trustee for the community college. He says the administration never justified the bond.

“The growth rate is not what they would have predicted, at least in my opinion. The   Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board   who had a clear and transparent methodology predicted far less growth than what Lone Star did.”

Scott says the college can handle growth in other ways, like online classes and maximizing existing classrooms.

But Ray Laughter with Lone Star College says the failed vote could complicate efforts to meet student enrollment.

“Well it certainly could impact the growth. As I said we’ve added a lot of students over the last 5 years — 30,000.”

He says registration for the fall semester is up by double digits. He says the college has already tried to increase capacity with more online courses and scheduling classes at unconventional hours.

“Students may need to find alternate ways for them to get their training or education for either transfer or for career.”

Laughter says it’s too early to say if Lone Star College will try to float a bond again in the near future.

The board of trustees will meet in June and start figuring out the next step

Bio photo of Laura Isensee

Laura Isensee

Education Reporter

Laura Isensee covers education for KUHF, including K-12 and higher education.

Previously, she was a staff reporter at The Miami Herald and regularly contributed to WLRN, the local NPR affiliate and Miami Herald news partner...