Texas Children's Hospital Opens New 15-Story Tower

Texas Children's Hospital opened a new building in the Medical Center today. It's a 15-story tower that will focus on women's gynecological care and high-risk pregnancies.

Texas Children's is branching out from pediatrics to include pregnancy care and other gynecological services.

The new building is called the Pavilion for Women. It has 99 licensed beds and cost $575 million dollars.

Dr. Michael Belfort is the chief ob/gyn.

"Texas Children's is now becoming a health care system as opposed to a children's hospital."

All 16 labor-and-delivery rooms are private and equipped for high-risk pregnancies All 16 labor-and-delivery rooms are private and equipped for high-risk pregnancies

The Pavilion is connected to Texas Children's by a sky bridge over Fannin Street.

It will focus on women with high-risk pregnancies, but any woman is welcome to deliver there.

Dr. Belfort says the delivery rooms include all the latest medical technology, so the family can stay near the baby no matter what happens:

"The parents are involved and they're going to be able to see the efforts that people go to in the resuscitation of their child. You know, I think this model of whisking the child off and doing something in a back room and coming back with a pronouncement of the baby's fine or the baby's not, can be terrifying and very dissatisfying for patients and families."

Nurse Carol Forsberg is Director of Women's Services.

She says the amenities include wireless fetal monitoring during labor.

"What that means for a mom is she is no longer tied to her bed. She'll be able to get up, walk around her room, walk around the entire unit and as well if she wants to labor in the bathtub or in the shower, the transducers are waterproof. So she'll be able to labor in the bathroom as well. So she can get up sit in the rocking chair, walk around the room – whatever it is that feels comfortable to her for her labor, she will be able to do."

Texas Children's CEO Mark Wallace says the Pavilion could eventually deliver up to 5,000 babies a year. It will also offer psychiatric services for women, menopause care, and high-tech fetal imaging and in-utero fetal surgeries.

Pictured left to right are Diane Osan, chairman, FKP Architects; philanthropists John and Laura Arnold; Dr. Charles D. Fraser, Jr., TCH surgeon-in-chief ; Cris Daskevich, senior vice president; Joel Staff, president, board of trustees; Mark A. Wallace, president and CEO; Ron Hulme, chairman, board of trustees; Dr. Michael A. Belfort, TCH obstetrician/gynecologist-in-chief; Kevin King, member, board of trustees; Laura Bellows, chairman, W.S. Bellows Construction; Dr. Paul Klotman, president and CEO, Baylor College of Medicine.
Pictured left to right are Diane Osan, chairman, FKP Architects; philanthropists John and Laura Arnold; Dr. Charles D. Fraser, Jr., TCH surgeon-in-chief ; Cris Daskevich, senior vice president; Joel Staff, president, board of trustees; Mark A. Wallace, president and CEO; Ron Hulme, chairman, board of trustees; Dr. Michael A. Belfort, TCH obstetrician/gynecologist-in-chief; Kevin King, member, board of trustees; Laura Bellows, chairman, W.S. Bellows Construction; Dr. Paul Klotman, president and CEO, Baylor College of Medicine.

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Carrie Feibel

Health & Science Reporter

Carrie Feibel is KUHF's health and science reporter. She comes to Houston Public Radio after ten years as a print reporter...