Houston-Area Women Suffer From Healthcare Gaps

A new report released today reveals that women in Harris County lag behind women nationally on key health measures such as access to doctors and maternal mortality. The report by the Women's Health Network of the Texas Medical Center is the first of its kind. Carrie Feibel has more.
For some illnesses, women here are similar to women nationwide. For example, among U.S. adults more women than men have asthma. In Harris County about seven and a half percent of women have asthma, compared to 4 percent of men.

But Harris County women fare poorly in other areas. Nationally, about 13 women die in childbirth for every 100,000 births. But in Texas the rate is 22 women and in Harris County it’s 31 women. And one-third of Harris County women are uninsured, far above national rates. Dr. Joey Fisher is president of the Women’s Health Network:

“There is a problem locally, statewide and nationally about many individuals not having health insurance, but women oftentimes are significantly affected by it, because women tend to be employed by small businesses, or work part-time so they’re not able to access health insurance.”

Fisher says the national health reform law could help some uninsured women afford doctor visits. But more coverage does not solve the problem of resources. Fisher says Harris County needs more mammogram machines and more places for women to get basic care such as Pap screenings for cervical cancer. One in five women here don’t get Pap smears regularly.

“It’s an important figure because cervical cancer is a preventable disease essentially if women get the recommended well-woman exam with a pap smear, you can essentially prevent it. So this is, I think, a travesty. And women of color are disproportionately affected.”


For more information, read the report “The Status of Women’s Health in Houston/Harris County: A Snapshot.”
Bio photo of Carrie Feibel

Carrie Feibel

Health & Science Reporter

Carrie Feibel is KUHF's health and science reporter. She comes to Houston Public Radio after ten years as a print reporter...