Census: So Easy Everyone Can Do It

By now most people should have received their census form in the mail. In the past, the form was longer and more detailed, but this time they've made it shorter and simpler to be sure that everyone is counted. For this report, Bill Stamps filled out his census and tells us what to expect.
If you're like me, your census form has been sitting on the kitchen counter somewhere in a stack of mail you may or may not feel like going through. You come home tired, there's bills to pay, children to feed and other things that need your attention, so the last thing you might feel like doing is filling out some long survey that you're thinking may never really affect you anyway.

But when you finally get around to opening the envelope and taking a look, there's one thing that will jump out immediately. It's short. Just ten questions.

"It is the simplest and shortest form in recent history. We're only talking ten questions. Less than ten minutes to fill out with information that's going to impact the next ten years of our lives."

Eduardo Guity works for the Census Bureau here in Houston. It got out my stopwatch and census form to see if what he says is true.

"Ready. Go."

Question number one: How many people live in your house? Number Four: What is your telephone number? Number five: What you're first and last name? If you have three or four people living in your house, you have to answer those same questions for each person. But over all, it really does take just a few minutes.

"One of the reasons why it's a shorter form was to take away the reason or excuse as to why not fill it out."

So this time around there should be no excuses. As they say, it's so easy even a caveman can do it, or in this case a news reporter.

For more information, visit http://2010.census.gov/2010census/.