Doctors Question Jackson Lee on Healthcare Bill

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee held another townhall meeting on health care . She's been getting a lot of criticism for talking on her cell phone during her first meeting. Bill Stamps reports — how things went today at St. Joseph Hospital.
"People are so afraid, everywhere I go — nationalized medicine, socialism."

It was the third town hall meeting in three days for Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee. But unlike the others, this one figured to be a little less contentious. That's because only doctors, nurses or patients were invited. But while some Americans are worried about losing their healthcare, some doctors, like Garland Gosset are worried about losing their jobs.

"You guys are regulating us out of business. And it's got to be very cautious, because at some point there will be no doctors to take care of patients. We simply can't afford it anymore."

Garland says they the government doesn't reimburse them enough for Medicare and Medicaid and he's concerned a new public option won't pay enough either.

"There's no way for us to meet real costs, employee costs, overhead, malpractice insurance and still try and feed our families when we're grossly under reimbursed."


Congresswoman Jackson Lee understood the doctor's concern.

"It's a big circle that I'm going to put on, we're already doing the reimbursement, the uplift, but I think there is a formula question that you're talking about—how we're doing this? And we should look at whether or not we should keep tying your costs to Medicare costs."


Cathy Davis is a nurse, who had to take care of her ailing mother for quite a while before she died.

"With this bill, I'm very confused, because the way we had to fight Medicaid and Medicare just to get her medicines."

"This is the fear of everyone that I have encountered over these last couple of days — whether or not the end of life counseling or the structure of the bill is to weed out the frail and the elderly. We can't allow that to happen."

There wasn't any yelling or screaming like we've seen at some of the other health care meetings across the country. The majority of people never even said if they were for or against reform. They simply voiced their concerns, like these two:

"A lot of what I'm hearing is a fear that this is going to raise our taxes."
 
"And we fight the insurance companies.  They have been raping and pillaging the people for years and they have posted unbelievable profits in this recession."

Congresswoman Jackson Lee says the proposed bill isn't perfect. But she says doing nothing would be worse.

"Right now, we will be seeing an increase cost in insurance of 1800 dollars per family if we do nothing. And that's something she says families can't afford."


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