Wednesday AM July 29th, 2009

One or two typos on a resume are enough to disqualify a job applicant, according to an Accountemps survey. Ed Mayberry reports.
Typos on a resume could eliminate job opportunitiesThree out of four executives interviewed say just one or two typos in a resume would remove applicants from job consideration. Forty percent say even one typo would rule out a candidate. Brandy Alexander with the Accountemps Woodlands office says employers view the resume as a reflection of the applicant.

"Especially with the job market. There's a lot of candidates on the market these days, and so there's a lot of competition out there. So honestly, there's no room for error, in their opinion, you know. They're staffing up new levels of talent for their organization, so they want top-notch people. And if candidates have typos on their applications or resume, the assumption is that they're going to make mistakes on the job, that they're not, you know, really going for this job."

Even in these days of spell-check, mistakes can occur in grammar.

"Send your resume out to several different people and ask them to proofread it for you, because they'll provide honest feedback and they'll catch little things that you might not catch when reading it. Take a break when writing, you know, your resume, and go back to it with fresh eyes after you've stepped away for a minute, and you'll also probably catch things that, you know, you overlooked originally. Sometimes readers inadvertently skip over parts they have read previously, so they don't catch things that could be spelled wrong or used in the wrong terms."

Alexander says it's easy to overlook typos or formatting mistakes when reading a resume on a monitor, so print it out for proofreading. Ed Mayberry, KUHF-Houston Public Radio News.
Bio photo of Ed Mayberry

Ed Mayberry

Local Anchor, All Things Considered

Ed Mayberry has worked in radio since 1971, with many of those years spent on the rock 'n' roll disc jockey side of the business...